Talking
Death

We believe it’s time to start a more open conversation about death and what it means to us today. There’s so much room to explore what feels meaningful and what our choices really are. This blog is a place to share new ideas, practical advice, and stories from the frontlines of death and dying.

In Conversation

Aindriú Peers is a practical lead here at Poppy’s, driving hearses, helping at burials and collecting people who have died from homes and hospitals. He’s also an author, teaches Shamanic Druidry and is a former Trappist monk. Aindriú explains his path from punk to monk to working in death care.

In Conversation

Aaron Thackray and Neil Wilford run our beautiful mortuary here at Poppy’s. Mortuary work can be shrouded in secrecy, but we believe that openness should be normal. In this interview, Aaron and Neil share their thoughts on gentle death care, the challenges of Covid-19, and why Neil was once invited to give talks on death during bingo.

In Conversation

Kate Ward is a palliative care nurse specialist and works as part of a team at Royal Trinity Hospice. She talks to us about palliative care, visiting Poppy’s with her colleagues and why deciding what your death should look like is too important to leave to other people.

In Conversation

Julia Samuel has spent her career thinking about grief. A distinguished psychotherapist and author of Grief Works and This Too Shall Pass, she’s spent nearly 30 years helping people work through bereavement, crisis and change. In part two of our interview, she shares how Covid-19 is disrupting grief and why it’s so important to acknowledge loss.

In Conversation

It can feel challenging to speak with children about death, but being open and honest can help them grieve. Daniela Iacovella from Child Bereavement UK answers common questions about death, dying and grief, from language choices to terminal illness to explaining a funeral.

In Conversation

Like thousands of other people during the Covid-19 crisis, Isabel's funeral plans for her mum were thrown out the window and the big gathering she had in mind, suddenly became something far smaller. Read about her story and how she still managed to say goodbye in a way that was meaningful and personal to her.